Home Headlines More women in upper management increases sustainability
Our website publishes news, press releases, opinion and advertorials on various financial organizations, products and services which are commissioned from various Companies, Organizations, PR agencies, Bloggers etc. These commissioned articles are commercial in nature. This is not to be considered as financial advice and should be considered only for information purposes. It does not reflect the views or opinion of our website and is not to be considered an endorsement or a recommendation. We cannot guarantee the accuracy or applicability of any information provided with respect to your individual or personal circumstances. Please seek Professional advice from a qualified professional before making any financial decisions. We link to various third-party websites, affiliate sales networks, and to our advertising partners websites. When you view or click on certain links available on our articles, our partners may compensate us for displaying the content to you or make a purchase or fill a form. This will not incur any additional charges to you. To make things simpler for you to identity or distinguish advertised or sponsored articles or links, you may consider all articles or links hosted on our site as a commercial article placement. We will not be responsible for any loss you may suffer as a result of any omission or inaccuracy on the website.

More women in upper management increases sustainability

by jcp
gawdo

Having more women in upper management at major companies has a positive effect on achieving sustainability, according to new research by Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU).

The study, conducted by Valentin Kiefner and Alexander Mohr from WU’s Institute for International Business and Christian Schumacher from Copenhagen Business School, examined how much of an effect the proportion of women has on a company’s support for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

They found a positive link between a high number of women in upper management and a company’s willingness to have more sustainable practices.

The researchers add that multinationals with a high international diversification, based on the sales of the company in different geographic regions, are even more likely to be able to enhance their support of the SDGs through an increase in the share of female executives.

“The reason for this is because women not only seem to be intrinsically more interested in sustainability goals, but also because they are subject to higher expectations from external stakeholders due to stereotypical perceptions of women in management,” says Professor Mohr.

Although gender equality is a central goal in itself, the findings suggest that gender equality on management teams may also help to achieve other SDGs, further increasing the importance of gender equality for multinationals.

The research was published in the journal of World Business.

www.gawdo.com

You may also like